Download The Best Binary Options App - For Windows

Part 2: Tools & Info for Sysadmins - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part 1)
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments or suggestions.
u/crispyducks
submitted by crispyducks to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Tools & Info for MSPs #2 - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part #1)
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments.
Graham | CEO | EveryCloud
Fyi - I've set up a subreddit /itprotuesday, where we feature / encourage posts of some additional tools, tips etc. throughout the week. Pop over and subscribe if you’re interested.
submitted by crispyducks to msp [link] [comments]

IT Pro Tuesday #64 (part 2) - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part 1)
Captura is a flexible tool for capturing your screen, audio, cursor, mouse clicks and keystrokes. Features include mixing audio recorded from microphone and speaker output, command-line interface, and configurable hotkeys. Thanks to jantari for the recommedation.
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments.
Graham | CEO | EveryCloud
submitted by crispyducks to ITProTuesday [link] [comments]

[PLEASE STICKY] How to avoid wasting your time and everyone else's time, and increase your chance of solving modded Minecraft crashes.

First of all: Don't post crashes on this thread. Create a separate text post. Obviously.

Summary

Know the common crashes

java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Close your /FeedTheBeastCrashes browser tab, give yourself a little self-facepalm, and allocate more RAM (some packs have RAM recommendations, look for that). Problem solved. If not, go to a bug tracker if you suspect a memory leak. Make sure to isolate the problem.
# There is insufficient memory for the Java Runtime Environment to continue. # Native memory allocation (malloc) failed to allocate 1577296 bytes for Chunk::new 
Paradoxically, this can mean you've allocated too much RAM, causing the java heap to exceed the physical amount of RAM available. Try lowering the maximum RAM allocation. Also try closing web browsers and other large software suites.
net.minecraftforge.fml.common.MissingModsException: or java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: Usually, this means you forgot to install a dependency. Look for hints in the crash report. The curseforge websites has a button to show all dependencies of a given mod, check that. If you still can't find a compatible dependency version, post here.
java.lang.RuntimeException: Invalid id 4096 - maximum id range exceeded. You've added too many mods and have run up against Minecraft's item ID limit. Either remove some mods, or use JustEnoughIDs (1.12) or NotEnoughIDs (1.7.10 - 1.12.2). I'm not sure what we did before 1.7.10 to solve this, but a solution exists. If anyone remembers what it was, post it, because my googling is failing.
java.lang.ClassCastException: class jdk.internal.loader.ClassLoaders$AppClassLoader cannot be cast to class java.net.URLClassLoader (jdk.internal.loader.ClassLoaders$AppClassLoader and java.net.URLClassLoader are in module java.base of loader 'bootstrap') You need Java 8. Minecraft does not support newer Java versions (9, 10, 11)

Crash reports & Logs

If your /FeedTheBeastCrashes post or bug report doesn't have any computer-generated text, then all we can do is guess. This is the most important part of this guide. Please also read the section below about pastebins
  • Post crash reports. Crash reports begin with ---- Minecraft Crash Report ---- and end at the end of the log file. Yes, the whole thing. Not some random line that you chose because you think it might be the problem.
  • If there is no crash report you can find, or you suspect it might provide additional context to a crash report, post the entire log file. If the problem is not a complete crash, it might be a good idea to provide the timestamp that the problem occurs at. It really doesn't matter if you think that the logs won't give any information. Post them anyways. If the Minecraft window opened at all, then it produced some logs.
  • How to find logs:
    • MultiMC https://github.com/MultiMC/MultiMC5/wiki/Minecraft-Logs
      • If you are using MultiMC and you are not posting a ---- Minecraft Crash Report ----, then along with the rest of the log, include the magenta text at the top of the log output. This includes useful information about hardware, the mod list, java version, java arguments, etc. Normally this is found in crash reports but MultiMC conveniently adds it to the top of the log output too. Hardware info is also available in all forge logs under [FML]: -- System Details --
    • FTB Legacy & Twitch https://ftb.gamepedia.com/Troubleshooting#Locating_Logs
    • Minecraft: %appdata%/.minecraft/logs/latest.log or ~/.minecraft/logs/latest.log
      • If you're using the vanilla launcher, do not copy from the log window, as this causes obnoxious formatting issues. Always find the actual log file.
    • Technic: %appdata%/.technic or ~/.technic
  • Indicate when the crash happens. As the game is loading? As your world is loading? The instant you place a certain block in the world?
  • If you're on a server, post both server and client logs. Communicate with your admin and try to work out what's happening.
    • Indicate the timezone difference between the server and client logs in your post, so we can match up what's happening on the server and client.

Pastebins - for posting logs

Avoid google docs. It loads extremely slowly, uses an annoying proportional font that breaks up vertically aligned plaintext tables, and makes it far too easy to screw up sharing settings to accidentally require a google login.
Avoid file upload websites such as Mediafire and GDrive. The log is not immediately visible and less people will go through the effort to download it.
Use a pastebin service instead, such as https://pastebin.ubuntu.com/ https://paste.feed-the-beast.com/ https://gist.github.com/. All of these except Github Gist can be used without an account. Pastebin.com is not listed because it has incredibly intrusive ads.
To use a pastebin, open the logs in a text editor like notepad, copy the contents with Ctrl+a Ctrl+c, and paste into the website text area. Do not set an expiration, as this causes link rot and makes it difficult for people to Google the same problem in the future.
If you insist on not using a pastebin, format your post properly by putting four spaces before every single line of crash reports and logs. Reddit Enhancement Suite has a button that will do this for you. This is perfectly fine, as long as you get the formatting right... just beware of the Reddit character limit.

Troubleshooting

Provide as much troubleshooting information as possible:
  • Google the error message, smartly. The error message is the line after the timestamp and description in a crash report, as well as anything after Caused by:. Then, when posting here, list out your troubleshooting steps and solution attempts in chronological order.
    • If this fails to provide useful info, include "minecraft", "forge", or the name of a mod with quotes in the google search.
    • If this still fails to provide useful info, try removing anything that looks overly specific (i.e. numbers) and replacing it with * in your search terms. (This does not apply to obfuscated internal minecraft function names such as func_78471_a. These are safe to google in quotes, since they are always the same within a given minecraft version)
    • For example, if your error looks like this, you might Google: minecraft advanced rocketry "NullPointerException: Unexpected error" "RenderPlanetarySky" Note where I took keywords from in the original log.
    • If the only result is a pastebin or gist link, then google that URL to find the actual discussion.
    • Generally, you're looking for issue trackers and forum posts. If a result is from github.com, forum.feed-the-beast.com, or reddit.com, there is a good chance it has a solution or explanation. If an issue tracker seems to indicate it's a bug that's since been fixed, then try updating that mod and its dependencies (backup your pack and world before trying this).
      • Know that not everyone in random forums know what they're talking about. You should try advice given in forums, but it might not end up fixing the problem, or might just be a troubleshooting step. Be wary of downloads, and generally practice safe browsing, including by using an ad blocker. VirusTotal is a website that can be used to check for malware, and the StopModReposts extension can check for malicious minecraft downloads.
    • Stack Overflow links won't be as useful, as they'll likely just provide generic information about a java error in the context of a totally different program. More so useful for mod developers. (No, this does not mean you should spam bug trackers with Stack Overflow links. Mod developers are well aware of how to find information on error messages)
    • If a result seems to have useful information but no solution provided works, add a link to it in your post here.
  • Tell us what you've tried, and whether or not the crash report changed after trying it. Include any important crash reports and logs.
  • Does the crash occur in a newly generated world? If yes, what about a superflat map?
  • Does the crash happen with other modpacks?
  • Does the crash occur in vanilla, and/or in an empty pack with just forge?
  • Without Optifine?
  • Without Foamfix, BetterFPS, Fastcraft, shaders, etc.?
  • Different Java version? Oracle JRE instead of OpenJDK, or vice versa?
  • After you update your operating system and other software packages, and reboot?
  • You may just need to clean up malware or incompatible software. If you've recently downloaded anything from Softonic or CNET download.com, there is a very high likelihood that you have minecraft-breaking malware. Do not use these websites, ever.
Potentially destructive troubleshooting/fixing—make backups:
  • What happens when you remove all entities with mcedit, or remove all crashing entities with B:removeErroringEntities=true and B:removeErroringTileEntities=true in forge.cfg?
  • What happens when you run Minecraft Region Fixer on your save? Note: the windows binaries are quite out of date, you will need to set up a python interpreter
  • What happens when you remove some items from your inventory using NBTExplorer?
    • If removing stuff from the world fixes the problem, keep a record of exactly what was happening before you fixed it, including logs and a copy of the corrupted world. You'll probably want to hit a mod's bug tracker. Remember that while it is of course important to get your own gameplay up and running again, it is likely other people are experiencing the same corruption problem. Nobody wants their important entities and blocks deleted. Mod authors being aware of corruption issues means less problems for everyone.
After these steps, the likelihood that you will even need to seek help to solve the issue should have plummeted. If not, continue posting.

World downloads

If you suspect a world is corrupted, there are several ways to share your save for independent testing. First, compress it as .tar.xz or .tar.gz with 7zip or PeaZip. Do not create .rar or .7z files, as .tar.xz is the exact same compression as .7z but with more widespread support. .zip is fine, but it doesn't have amazing compression ratios for Anvil files, and you should have 7zip installed anyways :)
As for actually uploading these large files: PixelDrain is a good hosted file sharing option. Dropbox, gdrive, github, and firefox send work too.
Make sure the modpack you're using is available for download somewhere so anyone can replicate the issue.
One thing you might want to do before submitting a world download to a bug tracker is to trim down your world files to a small test case rather than an unwieldy world download. Use Dinnerbone's coordinate tool to identify which region file a block is located in, and delete all the other regions and dimensions. Obviously, don't do this to your main copy of the world.

Performance problems

This section is now a comment down below.

Misc.

Use common sense and read. Crash reports aren't some cryptic code that you have to look up in some 3000 page book. They're the information the software thinks the usedeveloper will most readily be able to use and understand when something goes unexpectedly wrong.
Know when to hit the bug tracker. Have you isolated the error to a single mod or a single mod combination? What specific configurations does it occur in? Does the crash report sound like it's a coding mistake rather than an end-user configuration error? Do lots of testing and provide details. How to report bugs effectively
Title your post smartly. Don't shout "HELP!". Proper spelling and grammar can indicate that you're smart enough to go through addditional troubleshooting rather than expect a spoon-fed answer. Bad title: "[HELP] Wont work!!" Good title: "Enigmatica 2 - Crash when loading world" Better title: "Enigmatica 2 - Crash when loading world (ConcurrentModificationException)"
If you solve your issue, explain how you solved it, and make your post easily googlable by including the specific error message
Read through How to ask technical questions the smart way. ESR may be a bit blunt but that document is great.
Lastly, do not post photos of your screen, or screenshots/photos of text files. Screenshots and pastebins aren't rocket science.
submitted by Booty_Bumping to FeedTheBeastCrashes [link] [comments]

Chrome, Opera, Firefox extension for Cryptobo.com binary option trading

A GoodwinBit trading robot-forecaster, intended for automatic and semi-automatic trading on a binary option cryptobo.com.

The work is based on the mathematical-heuristic model of finding a point of entry into the market, built on the analysis of the input data of the largest exchanges, such as Bitfinex and Bitstamp. Based on the price data from these sites and the mathematical calculation of the levels of tolerances and corrections, the robot makes a forecast about the direction of the price curve movement, after which the order is placed in the appropriate direction, or a decision is made to automatically cancel it if the price unexpectedly went in the opposite forecast direction (Stop Loss).

Features:
- the ability to set Take Profit and Stop Loss;
- the opportunity to set the size of the bet;
- Auto-calibration relative to the current price of the option;
- support for the Martingale algorithm;
- indicator of profitability;
- Support for licensing.

Links:

submitted by dr_Nimnuln to cryptobots [link] [comments]

New Chrome Extension Bot for trading on Cryptobo.com binary option

A GoodwinBit trading robot-forecaster, intended for automatic and semi-automatic trading on a binary option cryptobo.com.

How to

The work is based on the mathematical-heuristic model of finding a point of entry into the market, built on the analysis of the input data of the largest exchanges, such as Bitfinex and Bitstamp. Based on the price data from these sites and the mathematical calculation of the levels of tolerances and corrections, the robot makes a forecast about the direction of the price curve movement, after which the order is placed in the appropriate direction, or a decision is made to automatically cancel it if the price unexpectedly went in the opposite forecast direction (Stop Loss).

Features:

Links:
submitted by dr_Nimnuln to u/dr_Nimnuln [link] [comments]

OSVR & WebVR: A Developer's Guide

First written: 2016-03-24 Minor technical updates: 2016-03-30

Introduction

WebVR is a web standard that aims to allow any VR HMD device (although currently only Rift, OpenVr, and Cardboard) to interact with any browser (again currently only Mozilla Nightly, and special Chromium VR builds) in a device and browser independent way. In effect, it's the equivalent of a Unity VR prefab, but for your browser (although Unity no longer requires prefabs for VR support since it's built-in to the product). Along with WebGL, and a javascript-based 3D graphics library such as Three.js, WebVr is attempting to make the web a first-class runtime environment for full immersive 3-d VR, on par with Unity or UE4.
With the recent introduction of WebVR 1.0 on March 1, 2016, this shows that WebVR is a maturing platform that is on its way to gaining wider acceptance. This is definitely an exciting time to be working with this technology.
OSVR and the Razer HDK is also another standard that is gaining a lot of momentum.
In this tutorial we will cover, at a detailed level for developers, how to setup a WebVR environment, and use your OSVR HDK to integrate with it. This is currently not a well-documented use case, and hopefully this article will save you some time if you're attempting the same thing. It's also a secondary hope of mine, that I can provide you with some good details on WebVR internals, which can aid you in debugging WebVR problems . I believe it can also be of use to anyone attempting to use WebVR in general, even if your HMD is not OSVR.
The format of this tutorial is similar to that of a previous tutorial I wrote describing how to get OSVR working the jMonkeyEngine game engine .

Background

I have been using WebVR for a little over a year now with an Oculus Rift (OR) DK2. But ever since OR driver v0.8, the graphics card on my laptop (Nvidia 650M) is no longer supported, so I am now unable to use my DK2. I subsequently ordered an OSVR HDK 1.3 HMD, and have been using that for the last several months. I was mostly using it with Unity5, but recently I decided to start working with WebVR and Three.js again. OSVR is not a natively supported protocol of WebVR, and with the introduction of the new WebVR API, it definitely took some effort to get my OSVR HMD working with it i.e. it was definitely not turnkey and not your typical WebVR experience.
The system I installed on is an HP Envy DV7 laptop, 8-core I7, 16GB Ram, Windows 10, gpu Nvidia 650M, driver 364.51, OSVR-Core-Snapshot-v0.6-1159-ga309a49-build251-vs12-64bit, SteamVR-OSVR-Win v0.1-86-g00093fb-core-v0.6-1169-ge9235a4, Chromium-WebVR-openVR build from 03-06-2016, three.js 0.74
I assume you already have OSVR installed, know how to start the osvr_server.exe, and can get an OSVR application like Unity Palace demo to run in full VR-mode.

OSVR Setup

1) Make sure you have the OSVR Tracker View App installed.
While technically not a requirement, this is your go-to tool for making sure your OSVR HMD is working properly. You will need to invoke it a lot if you're attempting to debug any OSVR problem.
2) Install the OSVR SteamVR driver. The github repo has some good instructions about how to get Steam VR installed, but I didn't build from the source, but downloaded the binary instead.
Basically, all this does is install an OSVR driver into your SteamVR directory.
OSVR driver screen shot
We need this driver because WebVR does not speak OSVR, but only Oculus or OpenVR. Thus we will present our OSVR as an OpenVR device to WebVR.
3) Start osvr_server.exe, if not already started:
[email protected]_laptop_envy /c/Program Files (x86)/OSVOSVR-Core-Snapshot-v0.6-1074-g11272ab-build243-vs12-64bit/bin $ ./osvr_server.exe [OSVR Server] Using default config file - pass a filename on the command line to use a different one. [OSVR Server] Using config file 'osvr_server_config.json' [OSVR Server] Constructing server as configured... [OSVR] Adding search path "C:\Program Files (x86)\OSVR\OSVR-Core-Snapshot-v0.6-1074-g11272ab-build243-vs12-64bit\bin\osvr-plugins-0" [OSVR] Adding search path "C:\Program Files (x86)\OSVR\OSVR-Core-Snapshot-v0.6-1074-g11272ab-build243-vs12-64bit\bin/osvr-plugins-0\RelWithDebInfo" [OSVR] Adding search path "C:\Program Files (x86)\OSVR\OSVR-Core-Snapshot-v0.6-1074-g11272ab-build243-vs12-64bit\bin/osvr-plugins-0" [OSVR Server] Loading auto-loadable plugins... [OSVR Oculus Rift] Initializing Oculus API... 
Note: how it says "Oculus Rift". This is probably because I have the OSVR oculus Rift driver installed. It is not necessary for this tutorial. I did try to get the OSVR to work as an Oculus Rift at one point (so I could use the Chromium WebVR Oculus build), but I couldn't get it work because I forgot that it requires you have the Oculus Rift Server running, which doesn't work on my laptop. I eventually got OSVR to work with the Chromium WebVR OpenVR build, which is the contents of this tutorial.
4) Display Mode I run webVR in Duplicate monitor mode (whatever shows on the primary screen will be echoed on the HMD): Duplicate Mode Screen Shot
Extended mode may work as well, but I've never tested WebVR with that configuration (jMonkeyEngine, on the other hand, requires it).

WebVR Setup

1) Get a WebVR compatible browser.
In general there two browsers that support WebVR: Mozilla Nightly Chromium VR Builds
The following notes apply: a) None of the standard versions of these browsers support WebVR out the box -- you have to download one the special versions listed above. This includes Google's Chrome Nightly build called Canary which, unlike Mozilla's nightly build, does not include WebVR support.
b) Since the nightly and special builds can use the same dll's as the standard version, sometimes you have a situation where you bring up, say, Mozilla nightly, but don't get webVR support because you brought it up after standard Firefox, and thus standard Firefox "registered" all it's dlls, which Nightly then re-uses. This seems to affect Firefox more, but since I use Chrome predominantly for my day to day stuff, I can usually bring up Mozilla Firefox in a "virgin" environment. Fortunately, I do seem to be able to bring up the Chromium VR build without interference from standard Chrome. Unfortunately, if you do experience this scenario, the only thing you can do to get around it is cycle your machine -- simply bringing down the browser, or logging off your userid will not release the dlls.
c) Currently, Mozilla Nightly does not support OpenVR. Thus, your only choice here is the Chromium VR Build. I used the chromium build from 03-06-16. The OpenVR build from 03-22-16 I found unstable, but YMMV. No browser currently has direct support for OSVR. Mozilla has stated they plan to add support for OpenVR and OSVR in the future.
OSVR has an oculus emulation mode as well. But it requires you have an Oculus Rift server running. If you can get the Rift server to run on your system (e.g non-laptop) I suppose you could go this route as well.
d) Download a version created after 2016-03-01. These will be versions that support WebVR 1.0. You might as well just get used to WebVR 1.0, even though most demos out there on the web don't support it yet. Also note that Mozilla Firefox Nightly does not currently support WebVR 1.0, which is surprising since they are the ones who introduced the standard in the first place.
2) How to deal with Chromium VR Builds and Norton Internet Security (antivirus program) For some reason, whenever I try to unzip the Chromium WebVR build or run it, Norton Anti-virus always flags some of its dlls with:
Suspicious.Cloud.7.EP Risk: High 
While I'm not a security expert, and I have never been able to find a decent explanation of what this virus is or does, I'm confident it's either a false positive, or it's innocuous. I've been installing WebVR chromium builds for over a year now, and they're all are flagged with Suspicious.Cloud.7.EP, but I've never have had any noticeable security problems as a result. The build obviously comes from Google, and although it may not be an "official" build, I think you can be confident it's not from some Russian hacker site as I worried about when I first got this warning.
Update 2016-03-30: I opened a ticket with the chromium VR developers on this. I do not get this problem on my system that runs McAfee. Bottom line is this is either just a problem with Norton, or just a problem specific to my laptop i.e. it doesn't seem to be a universal problem. Norton seems to be flagging because it has a low download count, and thus is "suspicious".
To get around this message and the subsequent file quarantine, launch the Norton antivirus application and navigate the following menu hierarchy:
Norton Antivirus->Settings->Antivirus->Items to Exclude from Auto-protect>Configure 
Then add the directory that contains Chromium WebVR, or better yet a parent directory into which you can install multiple versions of Chromium WebVR (over time, you'll find you need to install several builds as you upgrate to the latest version):
Norton control panel Norton excluded list example
Obviously, it's your decision if you think it's worth the risk (or indeed if you even experience the problem). Fortunately, Mozilla Nightly does not have this problem. So once Mozilla Nightly starts supporting OpenVR, or even better OSVR directly, then you should be able to use that as a circumvention.
3) Start up the browser in GPU mode. This may be optional on a desktop, but seems to be necessary on laptops (at least on my laptop). screen shot showing how to start Chromium with GPU
a) you can go into 'about:gpu' to verify if you're using your graphics card:
GL_VENDOR NVIDIA Corporation GL_RENDERER GeForce GT 650M/PCIe/SSE2 GL_VERSION 4.5.0 NVIDIA 364.51 
You may also see something like "Google Inc" as your GL_VENDOR. This is ok. You just don't want to see something from "Intel", which indicates it's using the built in graphics card on your motherboard.
b) go to the WebGL test site and verify your browser has WebGL support working.
You should see a rotating cube.

WebVR Usage

So now we finally get to goal of all our setup -- actually using WebVR and being able to see some cool 3-d images in our headsets. At this point, you could head over to MozVR and try your luck on some of the demos. As of this writing, it appears that none of the demos support WebVR 1.0, so that's not a very useful track at this point.
But since this is a tutorial for developers and geared towards people writing their own VR apps, we will concentrate on what it takes to get WebVR working with a javascript based web app.
This is also where I will diverge a little bit from my cookbook approach. For me to enumerate all the individual steps needed to create a hello world Three.js app -- e.g all the libraries you need, how to start up a grunt server, an overview of Three.js etc is way beyond the scope of this tutorial. However, if you're familiar with Angular JS, and want a template spinning cube VR angular app with which to start, you might want to try WebVR decorator which is yeoman generator I wrote a couple of months ago. Alas, it too doesn't work with WebVR 1.0 out of the box, but hopefully it should once webvr-boilerplate supports v 1.0 (as WebVR support is a library issue, not an app issue). Indeed, it was me discovering what I needed to do to make this template work again with WebVR 1.0 and the OpenVR Chromium build that prompted me to write this tutorial.
So we will get a little more conceptual here. Hopefully, there will come a day when interfacing OSVR with WebVR will be turnkey -- just install a few libraries and be on your way. It more or less is that way for users, but unfortunately not quite there for the content creators.

WebVR overview

There are essentially three components to the WebVR "stack": a browser component, a library component, and an application component.
The lowest level is the part that resides in the browser. This is WebVR "proper": the part that specifically deals with the WebVR specification. The other two components build on this foundation and are technically not part of the WebVR spec.
The next component is the library component which basically corresponds to webvr-boilerplate and a few modules in Three.js. While you technically do not have to use these libraries, to me it's basically a requirement in making WebVR useable and is effectively part of WebVR. It provides high-level functionality to the low-level abstractions in the browser. If you are reading this, and the webvr-boilerplate has not yet included WebVR 1.0 support, then make sure you use the webvr 1.0 branch
Finally, there is the application layer which is the basic workflow that is required by you to interface with WebVR. This will vary from app to app, but largely follows a consistent and standard core pattern.
One of the problems you're faced with if you're in the unfortunate position of having a non-working WebVR scenario is knowing where to look. Generally speaking, javascript in general, and WebVR in specific, have a tendency to fail silently -- not necessarily putting out no messages at all, but rarely putting out a meaningful message that says "Hey, here's where your problem is". So it's very useful to know how to examine each of these layers and thus help you narrow down on the problem.
We will now examine each of these layers in turn.

Browser component

There are two main functions: 1) navigator.getVRDisplays() 2) VRDisplay.getPose().
getVRDisplays returns an object that represents your HMD. getPose returns position and rotation information from your HMD.
These may not seem like much, but what they provide is very powerful. They essentially wrap hundreds, if not thousands of lines of dense, native C++ driver code that the HMD vendors provide as part of their development kits. I don't know if you've ever looked at the C++ library for Oculus Rift, but I for one am extremely grateful I don't have to interface with that code (not that it's not well-written, just that it's incredibly low-level and inherently complicated).
These two functions basically act as C++ to JavaScript converters, and they normalize all proprietary vendor protocols to one common protocol. Since these functions are now in the JS domain, it's just a simple matter of creating additional user-land JS libraries on top of them so you can start exploiting the raw information they provide.
This is also the reason why the browsers are slow to adapt new HMD protocols -- they have to find a developer who can figure out how each vendor's library works, and then write a WebVR adapter for it.
Here are some things you can to do to verify this layer is working properly.
1) Examine the VRDisplay object in your browser Javascript console:
a) make sure the navigator object has getVRDisplays function: Sample JS console session screen print
Sample JS log (text):
navigator.getVRDisplays >getVRDisplays() { [native code] } var a; var f = function(devs){ a = devs}; navigator.getVRDisplays().then(f); a[0] >VRDisplay {displayId: 1, displayName: " OSVR HMD", isConnected: true, isPresenting: false, capabilities: VRDisplayCapabilities…}capabilities: VRDisplayCapabilitiesdisplayId: 1displayName: " OSVR HMD"isConnected: trueisPresenting: falsestageParameters: VRStageParameters__proto__: VRDisplay a[1] >undefined 
As you can see, calling getVRDisplays returns a promise. You then call the promise, which in our particular case, will set var a. When examining the first element of a we can see that "displayName" is "OSVR HMD", with the "isConnected" flag set. This means that WebVR can properly locate and read our OSVR HMD.
b) call getPose(): Sample JS console session screen print
a[0].getPose() >VRPose {timeStamp: 4050, position: Float32Array[3], linearVelocity: Float32Array[3], linearAcceleration: null, orientation: Float32Array[4]…}angularAcceleration: nullangularVelocity: Float32Array[3]linearAcceleration: nulllinearVelocity: Float32Array[3]orientation: Float32Array[4]position: Float32Array[3]timeStamp: 4050__proto__: VRPose 
Here we can see that it returns basic positional info from the head tracker. As far as I know, WebVR does not support positional tracking (via the remote camera). Thus WebVR can be used for seated VR experiences only.
Update 2016-03-30: WebVR does return positional information via:
 vrInput.getPose().position 
Head Mount rotation is obtained with:
 vrInput.getPose().orientation 
So it can be used for seated and non-seated VR experiences. Positional tracking is useful even for seated VR experiences as well, as it can make looking around objects and at their sides more natural.

Browser Summary

If neither of these functions are working, then nothing else after this will work. So don't even bother trying to debug your framework code, or application code until you've verified these are working.

Library component

The high-level framwork code for WebVR is contained in webvr-boilerplate webvr 1.0 branch and in two modules in the examples directory of Three.js. That may seem like a lot of code, but there are basically only three modules I've ever had to deal with:
Three.js: three.js/examples/js/controls/VRControls.js three.js/examples/js/effects/VREffect.js webvr-boilerplate: webvr-boilerplate/build/webvr-manager.js 
In particular, VRControls.js is very useful to examine.
It's in looking at VRControls.js that I was able to figure out there's a new api for WebVR 1.0, in the form of getVRDisplays instead of the old getVRDevices.
Between these three modules, you should be able to put in some simple breakpoints and determine why WebVR is not working. For instance, from a breakpoint in VREffect.js, I was able to determine that the is-presenting flag was not being set on my VRHMD for some reason:
window.addEventListener( 'vrdisplaypresentchange', function () { isPresenting = vrHMD && vrHMD.isPresenting; }, false ); 
I was then able to hack around this problem by setting the default for this flag to true instead of false:
 VREffect.js: //var isPresenting = false; <-- comment out var isPresenting = true; <-- add 
Note: this is just a temporary solution, until the underlying bug is fixed by the code maintainers (I don't know if this is a webvr-boilerplate or browser problem).
The other thing I had to do, to get fullscreen working, was to make the following fix in webvr-manager.js in function requestFullscreen :
WebVRManager.prototype.requestFullscreen_ = function() { //vtvar canvas = document.body; <--comment out var canvas = this.renderer.domElement; <-- uncomment if (canvas.requestFullscreen) { canvas.requestFullscreen(); } else if (canvas.mozRequestFullScreen) { canvas.mozRequestFullScreen(); } else if (canvas.webkitRequestFullscreen) { canvas.webkitRequestFullscreen(); } }; 
I had to do this after noticing that clicking the fullscreen icon did not properly position the canvas.

Library Summary

The main takeaway I hope to convey is that WebVR is not necessarily a complicated or difficult code base. All the difficulty is tucked away in the adapter layer that interfaces with the vendor C++ code. The relatively tiny shell that resides in Javascript is not that hard. If you are having a problem getting it to work, don't be too intimidated to attempt finding out why. You just have to know where to look, and hopefully, armed with the information in this tutorial, you're off to a good start.

Application Component

This is the part I'm going to talk the least about, because other than your usual application level errors, this part usually works -- i.e we shouldn't have to spend a lot of time talking about how to debug it. This is the main WebVR module in my yeoman app, and works as well as an example as anything if you're looking for a reference.
There's basically only a couple of extra lines you have to add to a THREE.js app, as follows:
You need to get a VRControls object and attach your camera to it. Then you get a VREffect object and set it to the size of your canvas. Then you get a WebVRManager and attach you VRControls and VREffect to it:
 this.controls = new THREE.VRControls(this.camera); this.camera.position.z = 100; this.effect = new THREE.VREffect(this.renderer); this.effect.setSize(this.width, this.height); this.vrManager = new WebVRManager(this.renderer, this.effect); 
Then, in your main event loop, you call your VRControls object to get the HMD position and rotation information, which will then update your camera position:
factory.updateScene = function() { // This basically extracts the rotation and position from the Rift and puts // it into the cameras rotation and position. We previously defined the VRControl // to be attached to our camera. this.controls.update(); this.xyProjectionPlane.quaternion.multiply(this.xyProjectionPlaneQuat); this.cube.quaternion.multiply(this.cubeQuat); }; factory.mainLoop = function () { if( this.animationActive) { // we basically ask that we invoke ourselves in 1/60 of a second. This is // basically timed recursion. // after doing this fall through and do the rest of the function (call render) window.requestAnimationFrame( this.mainLoop.bind(this) ); } // update one render scene and leave. mainLoop will invoke again in 1/60 second // if requestAnimationFrame was previously called. this.vrManager.render(scene, this.camera); this.updateScene(); }; 
There is one aspect of your application design that may be affected by the lower layers of WebVR. It is that old bugaboo of all browsers -- that one browser can interpret the specification slightly differently than another.
For instance, I experienced a difference in the way Chromium and Firefox update the camera's position, described here:
a) Here is a snippet of the update function in VRControls.js:
this.update = function () { if ( vr Input ) { if ( vrInput.getPose ) { var pose = vrInput.getPose(); if ( pose.orientation !== null ) { object.quaternion.fromArray( pose.orientation ); } if ( pose.position !== null ) { object.position.fromArray( pose.position ).multiplyScalar( scope.scale ); } 
Bascially, what it's doing is calling getPose() to get the HMD position information and then it's putting into the object.quaternion and object.position. The object in this case is your camera, because when you created your VRControls object you attached your camera.
b) What I discovered is that Chromium ignores the previous position of the object (the camera) and just overlays the camera's position with the HMD values. Firefox appears to add the HMD's position onto the existing position of the camera. In other words, with Chromium, I have to maintain my cameras logical position position separately from it's physical position, and then add in my logical position to the HMD position each time:
this.controls.update(); // the following lines only need to be done on Chromium this.camera.position.add(this.camera.logicalCamera.po sition); this.camera.rotation.x += this.camera.logicalCamera.rotation.x; this.camera.rotation.y += this.camera.logicalCamera.rotation.y; this.camera.rotation.z += this.camera.logicalCamera.rotation.z; 
With firefox, I only have to call 'this.controls.update()' --it doesn't destructively overlay the previous camera position, but adds it in non-destructively. This wasn't always the case with Chromium. It used to work just like Firefox. Obviously, the interpretation of the specification is still in flux.
Update 2016-03-30: I also opened a ticket for this with the Chromium VR developers. It turns out my theory about "overlay" and "update" semantics is not correct. The problem is that, since I do not have my positional tracking camera plugged in, the pose.position is set to null for Firefox, and to a DOMPoint with zero coordinates for Chromium. Since Chromium does not return a null, it drives the code that overlays my camera position. So there is still a difference in the browsers, that can affect you application code, but Brandon Jones recommended a better solution which is to attach the camera to a dolly object, and then use your movement events to update that, and then use the HMD to update the camera's local coordinates relative to the dolly:
Of course, it's not always desired to have the user stuck at the origin of your scene. So if you want to move the user around and have they're head position be relative to a position you control, the solution is to attach the camera to a "dolly" object, like so:
var dolly = new THREE.Object3D(); dolly.position.x = 10; dolly.position.y = 10; scene.add( dolly ); /* Create camera, then... */ dolly.add( camera ); var controls = new THREE.VRControls( camera ); 
Now your camera position and rotation will be relative to the dolly, which you can use to apply other controls. See the Three.js WebVR Rollercoaster for a working example of this.

Application Summary

This part is pretty standard, but be aware of potential browser differences that you may have to compensate for at the application level.

Conclusion

In this tutorial I gave an overview of what's involved in getting OSVR to communicate with WebVR.
I may have given the impression that WebVR is really difficult to get working and takes a lot of debugging. I apologize if this is the case. It's not normally this difficult, having done it multiple times with several apps. I think this case was particularly difficult because I was using OSVR, which is not naively supported, and because there's a new version of the WebVR API that I had to deal with.
But that's a good thing for the purposes of this tutorial. It gives us the opportunity to start diving into some WebVR internals and get to know it a little better. I went into all the details about how to debug WebVR not with the intent of this being a step-by-step guide, but as a guideline to offer up an overview of what's involved with WebVR, and also to perhaps inspire you to not be afraid to attempt fixing any problems you may experience.
One of the "problems" with WebVR is that once you get it working in an application, you never have to deal with it again -- it just works. You futz around with it in the beginning until it works, and then you forget about it until you have to do it again in the next app. As a result, you never really feel like you understand it as well as you'd like.
I'd like to thank you for taking the time to read this article, and for your interest in VR. I wish you the best of luck in exploring this exciting new avenue for VR expression.
Happy VR'ing.
submitted by vt5491 to OSVR [link] [comments]

I think I've found an extremely fatal bug in Iceweasel

I've recently been experiencing a very weird bug in Iceweasel v26 which basically causes my entire system to lock up and become completely unresponsive.
Before I get into the details, I'm posting here in hopes of getting some tips on how to gather enough information to submit a useful bug report to either the maintainers/developers working on Iceweasel and/or Firefox.
The bug: At seemingly random intervals, my entire screen will become filled with a single colour which happens to be the background colour of the webpage that is open in the current tab when the bug occurs (this is how I guessed the bug was caused by Iceweasel and not an X servedriver bug - unless this may not be the case?). For example, I think the very first time the bug occured was when I was watching a video on liveleak and suddenly my entire screen was coloured maroon/red (the background colour of liveleak's website).
So far the only condition that I can tie to causing the bug is mouse interaction, I've had the bug occur when I'm either clicking or scrolling (I'm pretty sure it's never occurred while the browser was idle). At first I thought the bug was related to flash (I have flashplugin-nonfree installed), but the crash has occurred even when I have restarted the browser and a flash page hasn't been loaded yet. In the past hour, the bug has occurred about 6 times with the only pages being loaded being subreddits. I should mention though, I have iceweasel set to open up all previous tabs when it is started and some of my tab groups contain youtube links, so I'm not sure if this completely rules out flash potentially causing this bug since iceweasel may still be interacting with flash when it begins to preload some of my tabs and tab groups.
Anyway, what I'm hoping to get information on is how I can find information about how iceweasel is crashing, maybe through an error log. I'm not too knowledgeable about the logs in /valog but I tried looking at /valog/{dmesg,kern.log,messages,syslog,Xorg.0.log} in case maybe the kernel or Xorg is logging some information about a panic or segfault or such but there doesn't seem to be anything related in there. I've even checked ~/.xsession-errors but that doesn't seem to contain anything related either.
In fact, I'm not even sure if there is even any chance for the errors to get logged/written to disk since as soon as the bug occurs, I don't notice any hard drive activity (judging by my hard drive activity LED on my tower). I've even tried the Alt+SysRq+REISUB trick every time to invoke some hard drive activity, but it doesn't even seem to have any effect (the system doesn't reboot and it doesn't seem to flush the disk buffers, judging by the lack of activity from the HD LED). And I'm pretty sure the SysRq key is enabled since my /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq file contains a nonzero value (438).
I've also tried pinging and ssh-ing into the machine in its unresponsive state from another device on the network but never get a response (which tells me that this bug is doing damage on a kernel level and not just crashing the X server).
There was one time the crash occurred while I was closing iceweasel, which meant it was saving all my currently opened tabs and tab groups and writing them to disk. That time the HD activity LED stayed solidly lit while my screen was coloured blank. I waited a few minutes to see if maybe it would finish, and maybe it would indicate that the kernel was still responsive, but the LED never flickered and I couldn't hear any noise from my HD (the sound it usually makes when it's reading/writing), so it seemed as though the LED was just stuck in the on state (the state it had been in when the crash occurred).
I even tried downloading the Firefox v26 binary from the official Firefox site to see if the problem was specific to Iceweasel, but the crash also occurred in Firefox.
Information about my Debian installation:
Debian Testing (main contrib non-free) + experimental (main) which is where I'm pulling in Iceweasel v26 from (iceweasel and its dependencies are the only packages I have from experimental).
I should also mention that I always have a tonne of tabs open in iceweasel at all times (around 100+ ?), and I've been saving my session on exit for a very long time now without ever having problems as sever as this. The problems I've had before which seem to be caused by this overload of tab usage simply caused my iceweasel process to crash. I no longer get these crashes and only get this new bug which causes entire system lockup, so these 2 issues may also be related...
Anyway, I've basically hit a dead end in my debugging abilities so I'm wondering what my options are for gathering more information about the problem. I'm wondering if there's some sort of tool I can use to continuously record iceweasel's interactions with the kernel or memory which won't fail when the bug is triggered. I'm not sure if this is even possible since the kernel seems to be choking up entirely when the bug does occur and doesn't seem to be functional at all.
Apologies for the long post, just wanted to be sure I included all the information I have of the situation.
submitted by someone1987 to debian [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: We are the Firefox User Experience team, this is your chance to tell us about your pet peeves!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-03-08
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
What are you replacing it with? Feel free to take my notes as suggestions for operations which I hope are [easily] possible with whatever mechanism replaces this. I don't think we'll be encouraging plugins at all, it's not something we believe is part of the web. It was a necessary evil back in the 90s, but browsers can do pretty much anything a plugin is capable of these days.
I like you guys. We like you too.
Hm... not sure I agree with that sentiment. I'm no fan of plugins in most cases, but it seems like there are quite a few businesses which use them for various reasons, and you might be closing off a large part of the market without the feature. They'll still be able to install plugins — it's just that we are not going to go out of our way to convince you to install the plugin — that's their job. ;)
Now kiss. Link to i.imgur.com
I am a user of google chrome. what would make me switch to firefox? Firefox is built by Mozilla, a non-profit organization who's mission is to make the web better, more open, and more accessible, for everybody.
We have no interest in making money off of you. We're interested in making your web experience better, safer, and more secure.
If a choice came to us where we had to choose between making boatloads of money, or making things better for our users, we would 100% always choose making things better for our users. Every time.
If we had shareholders, they'd probably crap themselves. That's why we don't have them, and will never have them.
So, I guess there's my pitch. Our browser is built for you, and not as a vehicle to make us money. We'll never compromise on your safety, privacy, or security.
Plus, we're community driven. Come join us. :\)
Now lets talk on the technical side, Why switch from chrome to Firefox from a technical point of view? There are a couple of angles on this. First of all, we're 100% open source. You can read all of Firefox's source code. Every byte in the compiled binary is public for you to gawk at. And help with.
Chrome is not this way. The Chromium project, which Chrome is based on, is open-source, but then they take the Chromium code, pump in some other things that are closed (their own home-brew of Flash, and some other stuff), and that's what becomes Chrome.
Other technical reasons...our add-on ecosystem is far richer, and our add-ons framework is far more powerful... we tend to use less memory than Chrome (I'm serious) since we don't copy the process per tab...
There are more reasons I could list, but I also have a huge backlog of questions to answer. :)
Whose mission* I stand corected.
I love Firefox, and it is my primary choice for browsing. The one feature that bothers me though is that if I want to go to Private Browsing (Ctrl+Shift+P), my current window disappears. This can be annoying especially when I have a video open and when I get back to normal browsing it starts from the beginning and not where I left it. Have you thought about changing this practice so that a private browsing page opens completely on a new window? Thanks. Yes we have, and you can try per-Windows private browsing in Firefox 20 beta, Link to www.mozilla.org
It has been fixed, and is coming to Firefox in version 20, if I remember correctly.
Starting in Firefox 20 (currently in beta), we support per-window private browsing! You can get the beta here to use it today: Link to www.mozilla.org
I use a dark windows theme. Any way to fix this? File a bug! Link to bugzilla.mozilla.org
Why is there no Windows 64 bit version of Firefox? 64bit Firefox isn't a priority, as there are few benefits, and it's alot of work when there are other, large and more important projects to work on. 32bit Firefox runs well on 64bit windows for the time being.
Do you have to have a degree to apply for a design job at Mozilla/Firefox? or can you apply if you have relevant experience? Thanks for doing this AMA :) We have lots of people that are school dropouts, so it's certainly not a requirement. If you're talented, we'd love to talk to you!
Hey guys. Long time Firefox user but it is a bit of a memory hog. Any plans to slim it down? Yep, we've been tracking that, and have made some improvements. Of course, if you have the memory, doesn't it make sense to trade some higher memory usage for better speed?
We are always working on improving memory usage in Firefox (we have a team called memshrink working on it in every release). Have you tried Firefox 19 after a Firefox Reset?
We've been slimming down Firefox a lot in recent months - we call it the MemShrink project.
And we've been making pretty decent strides! See areweslimyet.com for a graph of our progress.
I should also point out that add-ons are almost always the first suspect when it comes to memory leaks and consumption. We've made that a bit better in recent versions of Firefox (since Firefox 15\).
At the moment, Firefox generally does better on memory than any of the other browsers in independent tests. So yes, it's a lot better these days, and we keep working on it! Check out the MemShrink project.
What happened to Australis? Why we have different tab style between Thunderbird and Firefox? Link to i.imgur.com
Wow it's beautiful! When will it come to Linux? Hey - I'm working on the Linux GTK port as we speak.
Curvy tabs are currently available in our UX Nightly builds.. Your distro might have UX in its package universe too, if you didn't want to grab the nightly from us.
Did you see that guys? limi rick-rolled us! I tried to be subtle about it. ;)
Will there be an option to turn of curvy tabs for those who don't want it? One of the reasons I switched from chrome to FF was because I prefer the current look of the tabs in FF 18. I'm sure somebody will develop a theme to switch you back. Without fail, when we introduce something, somebody in the community introduces an add-on that will switch you back. ;)
But that person will not be me - I'm biased, but I quite like the new tabs.
Have to use? Are you limited in what version of Flash you can use? Yes. The NPAPI version. IE does ActiveX, Chrome does Pepper.
Hey, not really much of a poster, but I love Firefox and as a graduating senior (related to this field), I figured I might get in on the act. What do you guys see as the single most important thing a person trying to get into the UX field can do to better themselves? Experience.
Build a product with someone, put everyday people in front of it, and watch it fall apart as they try to use it. Then, iterate until it doesn't. :)
Have a design process that you are able to communicate clearly to others. Even better if your design process is research-driven. :)
Why doesn't audio go through the browser as a middle-man so the browser knows which tabs are blaring music, etc? (And so you could mute a tab). Because Flash.
(Yes, I'd love to have this fixed too)
Because the NPAPI that Flash uses to hook into Firefox doesn't allow for this.
And we could spend resources altering the API and convincing Adobe to change Flash to work with it (unlikely)...
Or maybe it's time to do something a little webbier with Flash, like we did with PDFs...
Are any of you guys working on Firefox OS? I've contributed a teeny-tiny thing to Firefox OS, but that was just in my spare time.
If so how do you feel about jumping into this field as its a huge undertaking! I don't want to speak for the whole community, but I think it's safe to say that we're pumped. According to some of the old hands in the community, this feeling very much resembles the one we had before diving into the desktop browser world, and taking on IE. Gonna disrupt mobile and open it up. Feels good.
A sign of a close-interlinked company. IMO, more accurately, the sign of a vibrant, healthy, exciting community. Community > company.
An explicit goal for Firefox OS is to run well on low-end hardware.
INTEGRATED VOLUME CONTROL!!!? I would PAY for that! So would we! Unfortunately, it's pretty hard to do when Flash works the way it does.
I believe currently the entire interface currently uses CSS to mimic the native platforms UI. This is only partly true. Yes, we define the interface using the XUL language and CSS, but for certain things, we defer to the operating system to tell us how to draw things.
For example, I'm working on getting the tabs into the titlebar on OSX. The titlebar that we're using in this build is a XUL hbox with the -moz-appearance CSS property (non-standard) set to -moz-window-titlebar.
When we do that, we signal Gecko's widget layer that we want this to look like the native titlebar, and the code responsible for Cocoa widgetry takes care of painting that for us.
The same is true with things like progress bars. Those are XUL progressmeters, but we're definitely not drawing those ourselves.
The upshot about this is that we can (usually) use the same XUL across each platform, and then let the CSS and widgetry layer define how we paint it.
Things like scrollbars and bounce behaviours are pretty hard, but we're getting there. We've recently hired more Cocoa talent to work on this stuff, so you might start seeing it sooner rather than later.
Speaking of, if you're interested in trying tabs in the titlebar on OSX, a demo version should be appearing in tomorrow's UX Nightly builds...
I hope I answered your question!
Awesome! Any idea when it make it into the release version? I currently open Chrome when I need a clean private session. According to the release calendar, Firefox 20 moves to the release channel on April 1st. (And no, I'm not joking. :) )
Install a tracking cookie that alerts you to when I try do download another browser and then makes me click a whole bunch of "are you sure?" windows. Good idea. Maybe throw in a toolbar too. :D.
I have to restore last session to get my tabs to reopen. Ah, you mean that if there's a stray window and you close what you think is the last window, you lose your session. There is a timer (I believe) that is supposed to fix that, so have you experienced it lately?
If i somehow miss a stupid popup window (why do some websites still use those fucking things?) when closing firefox i lose that session, its annoying as all hell. If/when that happens, you can access the History menu (via the Firefox button in the top left on Windows or the menu bar on OS X) and reopen your window(s) from the Recently Closed Windows sub-menu.
I understand that your main source of revenue is referral fees from the search bar at the top right of the page. I like google as my search engine. I'm wondering, if I set my homepage (or go) to google and search from their bar directly, does Mozilla still get the referral fee? No, you have to use either the built-in search box, enter your search in the URL bar, or use our built-in home page (about:home). At least as far as I know, I'm not on the business development team. :)
Thanks for the reply! I'll keep going top right. Top left works too. :)
Thanks for the support! :) You also have the ability to donate directly to the foundation.
Or you can come get involved! Firefox is powered by the community, and we always want more. You don't need to be a coder - we need help with testing, support, triage...all sorts of stuff.
Come join us. :)
Edit: accidentally a word.
What kind of user testing do you guys do? Do you do in-lab studies, field work, focus groups? Hi! I'm a Senior UX Researcher at Mozilla.
We use a huge range of user research techniques. The primary ones that we use (in no particular order):
Qualitative, ethnographic interviews in the field (esp. in participants' home or office)
Diary studies.
Quantitative surveys.
Studies of user behavior using Test Pilot and Micropilot
User testing.
In terms of how we implement and use these techniques, we prefer to use multiple techniques within a single project (for example, a series of qualitative interviews, a diary study, and a quantitative survey). Using multiple approaches, allows us to answer questions that we can't answer with only one technique. Also, multiple approaches allows us to triangulate and validate the results from the different techniques among one another.
We do not have a lab nor do we intend to use one in the near future. As much as we are able to do so, we are firm believers in observing and understanding the actual context in which people use our products.
Saving images is slow, and I cannot figure out why. I usually just save pictures that are ALREADY DISPLAYED. Why is copying the file out of the cache folder 1000x fasater than right-click->save as? Your anti-virus software, if you have any, might be at fault here. Try disabling it, and seeing if this persists.
That's a good question. Did you file a bug? Link to bugzilla.mozilla.org
Also work in a support, and very often advice people to change to Firefox. Your new .pdf browser really makes the difference when having to choose between Chrome and Firefox, when changing from IE. Link to limi.net
As for improvements to it, my biggest issue was that if you opened a ton of tabs\windows (to the point where it became slow), you couldn't speed it up again by just closing tabs\windows. The only reason I can think this happens is that the tabs are kept in memory until you restart the browser. Perhaps I'm wrong, but if that's the case, couldn't you just keep a list of the closed windows\tabs page addresses, and re-connect to them? If not, go to Link to support.mozilla.org and we can help fix those crashes for you. Just making sure, you did a reset too?
If you enter "about:crashes" in the URL bar, you should see a list of reported crashes. If you've still got entries there, post a few recent IDs here (or PM me), and I'll take a look to see if it indicates what might be wrong.
Chrome starts up almost instantly... Firefox always takes a good 5-10 seconds to start up... just wondering if you guys have plans to implement faster start up? That's an unacceptably slow start time. Have you tried resetting Firefox?
If Firefox takes 5-10 seconds to start up, there's definitely something wrong.
Try updating to the latest version, and then Reset Firefox?
Link to support.mozilla.org
I don't see any way to pop them out into another window like Chrome, which is extremely helpful. On the latest Nightly, there is a button next to the close button of the Devtools console that pops it open into a new window. Not sure what release this is in, but it's coming.
I don't see anything for profiling JS/CSS/etc A JS profiler has been added to Firefox 20, currently in beta.
When there is too much horizontal pressure on the tabs, Firefox uses a carousel combined with a drop down that shows all the tabs. IE will use a carousel without a dropdown. Chrome will just shrink the tabs and will eventually prevent you from browsing any new tabs created. What were the reasons that lead you towards selecting a carousel and dropdown? What kind of telemetry do you see with users actually filling the tabs and using the overflow features? Do they use the dropdown often in those cases, or rely more often on the carousel? Actually, we have plans for improving that part. Most of it was done before we had any user behavior information at all, and it turns out it's not exactly optimal. (Not that other browsers do better :)
I was under the impression that tab groups were more or less unsupported at this point. Eg, nobody working on fixing bugs or improving the integration with app tabs and other things. Is this not true? What are the future plans for them? It is kind of stopped now since we are figuring out a plan to move it forward. It's definitely on the list of things that need some design love :)
Any plans to integrate support of Remote Web Workplace? I'd never use IE again if I could initiate "Connect to a Computer" option through remote web workplace on Mozilla. I'm not sure but I think its ActiveX. You are correct, Remote Web Workplace is ActiveX. ActiveX cant be run in Firefox and there are no plans to integrate that (It's a proprietary Microsoft technology that is very insecure and bad for the web).
Why do you want to set every fox on fire? Renewable energy.
I have a pet peeve / interface suggestion if that's ok. I kind of dislike that the options window is a separate, "pop-up" window, and not integrated into a tab (kind of like the add-ons manager is). Is it possible to change this in the future? While not a programmer myself, I understand enough that, probably, the first method one might consider in making this happen is to allow changing of settings via html or whatever (so that it could be put into the tab like a webpage might), but that could open firefox up to security vulnerabilities and other problems. One reason I would like to get rid of the popup options window though is that I sometimes need to change my font size minimums in order to view some pages properly. I prefer to leave them around 18-point for better readability, but some sites' formatting makes the words/labels bleed out of their boxes that they've so strictly designed to fit 12-point and nothing else. So I was thinking it might be nice to leave the options window open... but you can't do anything like browse or change tabs while it is open as a popup, especially when it stays on top of the browser window. If it was a tab though, it would be no problem. Also, I am aware of, and use, add-ons like No-Squint and such, but they don't always help due to a page's "over-done formatting". Plus I guess I just kinda have my own way of doing things though, you know? Well, there's my $0.02. We're doing exactly that! The preferences will be moved to a tab.
Guys I really do not have any. I love firefox. But if I had to ask you...You guys ever thought about incorporating ghostery into the standard package? We've made several changes in that direction (e.g. Do Not Track), and stopped accepting cookies from third-party providers (unless you have visited their site already). Implementing all of what Ghostery does would probably massively break the web. When you have a few hundred million users, you have to move carefully with these things. The web is (for better or worse) an advertising economy.
As for me personally — yes, I think we need to do even more. But it's more complex than it appears at first glance. :)
I use a master password in FF, but when the wrong pass is entered cookies are still retained, so another user could get into Facebook (for example). I know I can log out of FB daily but that sucks. Can we make the master password close the cookie jar? Yeah, Master Password needs a redesign.
Blake can you link me to bugs/wikimo pages about that? Looks like it'll have serious implications for my new tab add-on. I don't think there is any of that yet. The prototype is mostly stuff that UX is playing around with to see if we can make that page better for users. But throw me some email (at my username at mozilla.com), and I'll let you know when stuff moves forward…
What are your opinions on the add on Add Blocker and the possible income it takes away from websites? AdBlock actually allows unobtrusive ads, so I like the way it forces ad agencies to play nicer.
For me this is usually just a timing issue. I open it too fast after closing, and it works fine when I try again. So can you not just have the new process wait a second after the first failure and then try again before popping the error? That's a good idea. Yes, something along these lines might be a good mitigating solution.
Why does Firefox eat all my memory? Out of the three web browsers I use Firefox is the most demanding memory wise and usually causes my computer to have problems. Dell Xps M1330 Win 7 64bit ultimate 4GB RAM Intel core 2 duo. Link to support.mozilla.org
Is there a reason that you go with separate search and URL bars, rather than a Chrome-style universal search bar thingy? Historical reasons. And some privacy ones. We do want to merge them.
What is the deal with "Plug in container"? It fucks up all the time and eats all my memory. Ever since you guys added that Firefox has kinda sucked. That's Flash sucking, not Firefox.
Not a peeve, but an idea I'd like to see: Being able to easily identify which open tab is producing sound. More than once I've had to close down my browser because some ad with sound started playing and I couldn't find which ad on which page was playing it. Curiously enough, I just got email about this. Someone has a patch that adds a global volume control, and controls to mute all the tabs, or all the non-visible tabs. So that's certainly something we'll be looking into… :)
I answered this over here.
It's quite annoying when you exit out of Firefox then immediately try to open it again it gives you the "Firefox is already running in another process" error. Other than that, love Firefox! Yeah, that does suck indeed.
What's happening is that Firefox is still in the process of closing, even though the window has disappeared. When you try to re-open Firefox, it flips out, because the first process hasn't finished up yet.
The performance team is working hard on this on the "exit(0)" project. It's a P1 goal. You can track our progress in this bug. (make sure to follow Bugzilla etiquette if it's your first time).
Yeah, this sounds like it is not shutting down fast enough. Try a reset?
Link to support.mozilla.org
That's when I open the task manager and shut down that process. Hold the pillow over it's face. Sleeep... No tears now. I enjoyed this comment. Have an upvote.
Ending the process, I find, works like a charm. Yes, but it shouldn't be necessary! Try the reset. :)
smooth as butter for several hours. Then, after that, everything gets laggylaggylaggy One thing we are considering is to unload tabs you haven't used in hours/days from memory, similar to how we restore background tabs on-demand when you restart.
I never know if Firefox is going to remember my tabs from last time or not. When Firefox starts: Show my windows and tabs from last time.
I'm sure our performance team would be interested in the output of the built-in Profiler, if you can capture it when it's lagging… One thing we are considering is to unload tabs you haven't used in hours/days from memory, similar to how we restore background tabs on-demand when you restart. Here are docs on how to report a performance problem when you come across them: Link to developer.mozilla.org
I wish sync was easier to use/understand. I just want to to put in my username and password and have my browsers sync across all PC's that use. We definitely agree and there is very active work going on to make this happen. Please stay tuned!
Yup, Sync is a bit of a mess, and is being re-done.
One of the things that I wanted to tackle when I started at Mozilla was re-doing sync because I thought it was really cool, but an impenetrable user experience for most users. Turns out, looking at our data it is an impenetrable user experience for most users.
It is in the process of being completely redone and integrating other data services that you would want to sync among your devices.
Sync is such a mess im amazed it got the get-go to roll. I'm an IT guy myself, but even I hate it so much that I use chrome at times when I need this functionality. You're not the only one. I don't think anyone likes it in its current state. (and yes, then the question is… why did it ship?)
Oddly enough, I actually love it in its current state. <3.
One wish: manually control if i want a PDF to be viewed in firefox or downloaded. It seems that the website usually decides this and it is annoying as hell when they guess wrong. Thanks! You can tell Firefox what to do with PDFs in the Options (or Preferences) dialog, under the "Applications" pane.
Find "PDF" in that list, and then set the action on the right.
I don't know if this is a known bug, but anytime I'm on a page with a Flash player, particularly YouTube, I can no longer use my computer's volume control buttons. Flash integration is always a pain, and especially around focus issues. Flash is allowed to steal keyboard shortcuts etc, which is very frustrating. It was our #1 paper cut issue three years ago, and it still is. Luckily, Flash is slowly disappearing. That doesn't mean we shouldn't do everything we can to fix this issue in the meantime, though. (Both IE and Chrome have a different version of Flash than the one we have to use, which makes things complicated.) This has been a reoccurring issue since Flash 11.3 was released. Can you go to about:addons and see what version of Flash is installed? I just checked mine and I actually had 2 (?!) versions of Flash installed (11.5 and 11.6). Uninstalling Flash through the Control Panel (on Windows) and reinstalling clean from Adobe's site gave me Flash 11.6 and I can no longer reproduce the bug. I hope that helps.
Works fine in IE, and Chrome, but not in Firefox.
I feel like it's the only thing that truly bugs me about the browser. Other than that, great work, I don't think I'll be changing anytime soon.
Flash hijacks most keyboard input, so even commands like control-w (to close the tab) don't work. I know this has an open ticket (and has for a while) but I would really love to see it fixed. Me too!
We have people working on it as we speak! You will see a better new tab soon. And for now you can hide the boxes by clicking on the grid thing on the upper right of the page. A terrible-looking example of one of the designs we're looking into is at this prototype page.
I use Firefox for porn, thanks. If you're not using Firefox Beta, Aurora, or Nightly, then you're in for a treat when you check them out.
EDIT: Fuck yeah, thanks for the reddit gold! We now have a new implementation of our Private Browsing that will open in a separate window instead of swapping your current browsing context.
If you're not using Firefox Beta, Aurora, or Nightly, then you're in for a treat when you check them out. We now have a new implementation of our Private Browsing that will open in a separate window instead of swapping your current browsing context. Engagement rings for everybody!
I was kinda confused when I would do my normal Ctrl Shift P and it now pops up a Private WINDOW instead of closing the regular window altogether and opening a purple private one. Now it's just too easy to close up when you're done. You don't have to restart all your tabs! I get kinda confused when I hit Cmd-Shift-[ to switch tabs, and get a new Private Window, cause my fingers are shifted over a key… ;)
Keep your strong stance on user privacy and you'll have me as a user forever. You can count on it.
We do our best!
But how will we know? ;-)
Having the options and settings in the upper left hand under "Firefox" is confusing and the opposite of Chrome and Internet Explorer in Windows, which leads to training headaches with users. We're moving the menu to the right side, see the Australis redesign project.
I agree, this is ridiculous, and I complain about it every chance I get. Can you say "pet peeve"? :D.
We have lots of people that are school dropouts, so it's certainly not a requirement. If you're talented, we'd love to talk to you! A link to our careers page would probably be useful here, too… ;)
Last updated: 2013-03-13 05:50 UTC
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